Lighten up a little…it’s Christmas!

December 19, 2007 @ 8:49 am
posted by kris
Filed under: misc

The last post I wrote about reverse culture shock has gotten some people upset. I apologize to those involved. When I first got the comment about asking if I even liked Germany at all, I was really upset. It bothered me a lot. The problem with blogging is that you cannot necessarily pick up on the tone of a post. I just assume the only people who read my blog are people who know me personally or people who I have had more than just casual “internet contact” who kinda know me and my personality. Some people read it as offensive to Germany. I never meant to put down Germans, or living in Germany, although I do stand by my comment of their garbage bags really sucking. Most Americans saw it as funny, and I think that maybe you need to be an American or live in the US to understand these things? I dunno…

What I talked about is *my* opinion of what I miss in the US, and what I forgot about since living in Munich. That doesn’t mean that because Munich/Germany isn’t that way it is bad. It means it’s different and I’m fine with the difference. If I didn’t like living in Munich, I would move back. There are lots of things that I like about Munich that I don’t like about the states. But since I’m now here after a year long absence (and two years since we moved), I thought it is appropriate to tell y’all what is going through my head. There are some European readers that prefer the exact opposite, and that is totally fine with me, it’s all how we grew up and what we’re used to.

EDIT: I wanted to say as an example, while I do appreciate the low stress and “comfy” driving in the US, I like that I don’t really need a car at all when in Munich (or pretty much any European city). And while I do love the squishy sandwich bread of the states, I still miss the baked-fresh-around-every-corner “brezen” (pretzels) and non-sandwich bread varieties.

So I hope that clears things up. I normally don’t write stuff like this in my knitting blog, but thought it was something that would be fun. Next time I will stick with the knitting…sigh…

Speaking of which, I went on a mini yarn crawl in Houston and came home with more than I ever thought I would buy! I went to the lovely Twisted in Spring, TX and then went to a knit group at Yarns 2 Ewe in Houston. The gals there were super friendly and I was amazed at how many people there were! I just love the southern accent! They all were just nuts over the Hanami shawl I made, and I think that several of them will make it now. The group had a few sock knitters, but a lot of them were lace shawl knitters and were making some really gorgeous stuff.

I am hoping to meet some knitters here in Hawaii as well as in Seattle when I go next month! Wahoo! Red Mill Burgers, here I come!

Comments (13)

13 Comments

Comment by tini

Made on Wednesday, December 19th, 2007 @ 9:15 am

ooohhh nooo, please don’t stick just to knitting! I love to read another perspetive (how do you write that?) of things even if I might not agree :) I really like to see the difference in people! That might upset some but if it gets people thinking, than it is a good thing.

Comment by alala

Made on Wednesday, December 19th, 2007 @ 10:08 am

I second Tini, and tbh, I really think Steph’s defensiveness was totally uncalled-for. I’m so sorry that you would feel you have to change your blog to suit her preferences, when the rest of us saw nothing offensive in that post. You’re right, it’s all in how you grow up, and going “back home” once in awhile is wonderful for making you appreciate both your old and your new cultures. You weren’t attacking either, and while it’s too bad that Steph doesn’t understand that, it’s really not your fault.

Comment by Ulli

Made on Wednesday, December 19th, 2007 @ 11:21 am

Yes it is that where you grew up thing, I agree. In the other way round, it is just the same. It doesn’t even take a year for me to miss things. When I am vacationing in the US for a couple weeks, man, do I miss German bread or chocolate or or or. I just can’t imagine living without that. And in these couple of weeks it really gets on my nerves, that I cannot shop without producing so much garbage and wastig resources, which is not luxury to me.It is just normal, that you miss things that you are used to. I still like it over there as well as over here pretty much.
In some comments though I felt like people think that only the US citizens could afford luxus. I do not think it is more convenient there as it is here. It is different though.

Comment by tini

Made on Wednesday, December 19th, 2007 @ 11:45 am

*gettingupontothesoapbox*
Uli, I don’t think that people are assuming, that just the US citizens can afford luxury but that a lot of US citizens are more used to get things the easy way. If that is good or not, about that there are 1234761354 different opinions. I think, that the people living in the industrial developed countries should be gratefull that they have soooo much convinience like food, water, electricity and shouldn’t take that for granted!
I for myself will try to lessen my impact on the nature hence I would prefer thinner aluminium foil without a metall border but instead buy a thing were you can put all your foils in and use that forever. O.k. I might not do that since I rarely use any foils and have reusable stuff for the oven.
Kris stated, that she is so much greener here and that is a good thing IMHO and I hope that everybody will be thinking greener soon. Saving the climate starts with every single one of us!
*gettingdownfromthesoapboxnow*

Comment by knitlady

Made on Wednesday, December 19th, 2007 @ 2:17 pm

You don’t really have to cross the border to miss things you used to have. I only moved from north to south and that gave me something like a culture shock :) I third Tini, it’s the grow up thing that makes us feel in this way. Please, do not only stick to knitting, I love to read posts like that, not only because i was never able to live in another country for more than two week, also because my boy was grown up in the States and then came back (his parents are Germans). It’s very interesting to hear about the normal life in the US, not the Telly version ;)

Comment by Jenn

Made on Wednesday, December 19th, 2007 @ 3:01 pm

Awww, don’t just stick to knitting! I like to read about lives behind the knitting. :)

Comment by Bobbi

Made on Wednesday, December 19th, 2007 @ 3:57 pm

You’re right, people need to chill…don’t worry, we still love you!

Comment by Elemmaciltur

Made on Wednesday, December 19th, 2007 @ 4:21 pm

LOL, I’m so not going to add any more tuppence to this topic and will let it rest.

On the other hand: What did you get?!

Comment by stacey

Made on Wednesday, December 19th, 2007 @ 4:26 pm

Enjoy your travels and be safe over the holiday!

Comment by Mia

Made on Wednesday, December 19th, 2007 @ 9:24 pm

Obviously you touched a raw nerve for some one. But it is your blog and it is your opinion. Every culture has its good points and bad points. And American culture has a lot of bad points it is just that most Americans have never been away to realize it. When Americans go overseas, they tend to stay in tourist areas and don’t see the day to to day things. And the same happens when others visit the US. I hope you are able to hook up with some knitters while you are here.

Comment by scoutj

Made on Friday, December 21st, 2007 @ 5:44 am

word

Comment by shadkitty

Made on Saturday, December 22nd, 2007 @ 2:53 am

oh *hugs* I don’t know who thought you were stepping on toes, but we were raised in my house to have/appreciate a sense of humor. Don’t worry so much about hurting others’ feelings, those who truly know you would know that you were just…thinking in type. There is room enough in our hearts to love many places. Just because I was raised in Maryland, and will (at heart) always be a Maryland girl…some days I am happy not to be there. You don’t love one child more than the other because of their differences…their differences are what makes each of them so important. Same thing with countries I’d assume.

Smile, we love ya. :D

Comment by marietta

Made on Sunday, December 23rd, 2007 @ 6:32 am

i loved your previous post and completley get it! No matter how much you love your new adopted country/state – you will always miss with what you grew up with..and then when you move back, you miss the things from the now old place (such as i really missed sweet tea when going back to new jersey) – i went through almost the same reverse culture shock when i came home from austria – and of course i so want to move back there (or germany will do) – the homes of landliebe joghurt, mueller milchreis, banane milch, small packages of tissues cheap, imbiss’s, breweries every where and regia sock yarn at the edeka or familia….

keep it up the posts!



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What does bockstark mean (pronounced bok-shtark)? My crazy German friend, Matthias, made that word up to mean "really cool" and says that it is catching on in Garmisch. So I am helping him popularize the word! I thought if I ever opened a yarn store, I would call it "Bockstark Yarns". This blog is all about my projects, yarns and crazy ideas related to knitting and other crafts. Contact me at bockstark.knits(at)gmail(dot)com.